lunt

Thursday, October 19th, 2017 07:54 am

[domesticity] That doesn't sound good...?

Thursday, October 19th, 2017 08:44 am
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
The water pipes in my apartment have abruptly started acting weird: very noisy and comes out sputtering. There seems to be air in the pipes. This started yesterday – first noticed when the toilet tank was refilling with cold water, checked the kitchen taps, and the cold water was doing it there, too. Then the hot water started doing that too, which has me more alarmed: that comes right out of my apartment's water heater tank, so there shouldn't be any opportunity for air to get in it, right?

I called the landlord yesterday, left a message about it. There's construction going on on the floor below me, but I asked one of the guys if they're working on the plumbing and he said no.

It's still doing it.

How worried should I be? What scenarios could be causing this?

QotD

Thursday, October 19th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"Despite everything, no one can dictate who you are to other people." -- Prince (Prince Rogers Nelson, b. 1958-06-07, d. 2016-04-21)

frit

Wednesday, October 18th, 2017 07:49 am
prettygoodword: text: words are sexy (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
frit (FRIT) - n., the calcined or partially fused mixture of sand and fluxes used to make glass; a vitreous substance used in making porcelain, glazes, or enamels.


By vitreous is meant it was glass but now has been granulated. The latter is the more common meaning -- the stuff that, once melted, will be turned into glass glassmakers now more commonly called a glass batch. Adopted around 1660 from Italian fritta, from feminine past participle of friggere, to fry, from Latin frīgere, to roast/fry, referring to the calcining preprocessing. (SO, yes, a fritter is something fried.)

---L.

QotD

Wednesday, October 18th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"If you want to change the future, start living as if you're already there." -- Lynn Conway, 2013-07-14

[Though I think taking it too far and living as if "I don't have to work toward this because it's already done," might be counterproductive. Still work to make the change you want catch up to you.]

[hist] Oh, hey

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017 11:57 pm
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
It was just brought to my attention that per the date traditionally held to be the one on which Luther nailed the 95 Theses to a church door, this Hallowe'en is the 500th anniversary of the start of the Protestant Reformation.

Thought of the Day

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017 11:29 am
grim23: (Default)
[personal profile] grim23
“People inspire you or they drain you - pick them wisely.” ― Hans F. Hansen

corm

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017 07:56 am
prettygoodword: text: words are sexy (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
corm (KORM) - n., a short, swollen underground stem of a plant used as a storage organ for winter or times of drought.


Cultivated plants with corms include crocus, gladiolus, some irises, taro, and arrowhead. Different from a tuber, which is a swollen root or rhizome and can be used for propagation, and a bulb, which has layers (see: onion). Adopted in the 1820s from French corme, from Latin cormus, from Ancient Greek kormós, trunk stripped of its boughs, from keírein to cut off/hew.

---L.

QotD

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"Speak properly, and in as few words as you can, but always plainly; for the end of speech is not ostentation, but to be understood." -- William Penn (b. 1644-10-14, d. 1718-07-30), +++verify source&work+++

(no subject)

Monday, October 16th, 2017 09:57 pm
randomdreams: riding up mini slickrock (Default)
[personal profile] randomdreams
I went to Moab, Utah, over the weekend to meet some G+ friends and ride all over creation. I'll post pictures later. It was utterly exhausting, mostly because I rode with them in the morning and then went and rode really hard in the evening on my own. I am officially no longer in contention for world-class racing. Dammit. But I am within a few percent of my best times from 15 years ago, which is nice. (Less peak power, but way better endurance.)

Right now I'm battling a spigot. We have frost-resistant spigots on the house, and both have now failed to a lesser or greater extent, one no longer working at all but at least not leaking, and the other leaking at somewhere between the rate a dog would pee and maybe a drop every two seconds if I mess about with it. Traditionally, frost-resistant spigots are easy to fix: you shut the house water off (or, in the case of my previous house, you turn off the cutoff valve I installed in the plumbing right in front of each spigot, for exactly this situation) and extract the spigot valve from the body and replace the gasket and you're good for another 15 years. Well, I shut off the house water and extracted the valve control hardware, and it doesn't have a gasket on the end. The entire valve control assembly is buried in the wall. The only access is by cutting a hole, either in the nice hardwood floor in the bedroom, or in the finished/textured drywall ceiling in the nonfiction library. I'm choosing the library.

Thought of the Day

Monday, October 16th, 2017 02:32 pm
grim23: (Default)
[personal profile] grim23
Unhappiness is not knowing what we want and killing ourselves to get it. - Don Herold

corf

Monday, October 16th, 2017 07:53 am
prettygoodword: text: words are sexy (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
Theme week! -- four-letter words.


corf (KORF) - n., a small wagon, sled, basket, etc. for carrying coal, ore, etc. in a mine; a basket or cage used to contain live fish, lobsters, etc. underwater.


The first is primarily British usage. In Middle English this meant generally any basket, from either Middle Dutch corf or Middle Low German korf, both probably from Latin corbis, basket.

QotD

Monday, October 16th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"One week after Jeff Sessions changed DOJ policy by refusing to protect transgender people under Title VII and launched a sweeping license to discriminate against LGBTQ people, he's seeking credit for prosecuting a hate crime? We believe Americans deserve an Attorney General willing to address systemic discrimination and enforce policies and laws that prevent hate violence in the first plac
e."

-- Sarah Warbelow, Human Rights Campaign Legal Director, 2017-10-15

Pretty Routine

Sunday, October 15th, 2017 10:43 pm
dr_tectonic: (Default)
[personal profile] dr_tectonic
So I last posted a week and a half ago and didn't even mention that the evening before we has Cris & Steve and Brandon & Gene over. We played Wise & Otherwise, and a round of 7 Wonders, and a few of the Jackbox games, and a good time was had by all.

Then last Saturday we went to Mary's for food and socialization along with Kate, Sarah, and Mary's nephew. We played a round of Citadels and one of Ticket to Ride. Mary made a bunch of tasty dishes and Sarah cooked a turkey breast and it was all excellent.

On Sunday afternoon we went to Tim & Stacy's, but we couldn't stay too long because my parents came into town to drop off a car for Leslie. We had dinner with them and Dave & Michelle (et al) at Cheddar's. Mom & Larry spent the night in our guest room and took off early the next day. I was planning to work from home because a big snowstorm was forecast, but it didn't accumulate on the roads, so I ended up going in to the office after all. Oh, and I remembered that it would be a smart idea to sweep dead leaves off the patio and clean out the gutters before the first big snow! So I felt all adult about getting that done on Sunday afternoon.

I made up for it by staying home on Wednesday after my dentist appointment. I had the other half of my deep cleaning, plus got a cracked filling replaced, and the after-effects of the anesthetic just knocked me on my ass. I actually napped for a couple hours after I got home. Felt human enough to go to my Board meeting that evening, which featured a very long group discussion with the Chief of Police, which was heartening (especially given how unpleasant the news is all the time these days). There's always room for improvement, but the impression I got is that things are generally on the right track and if there are any changes wanting to be made, they're small matters of implementation, not big course changes. (I should mention that if I ever post about the Inclusivity Board online, I am of course just presenting my own personal opinion, not speaking on behalf of the board. So there's your obligatory disclaimer.)

Went to Games Night at Chris's on Thursday, and otherwise there's not much else been going on. We did nothing at all social this weekend, just grocery shopping and chores. Didn't get all the things on my list done, but dealt with a bunch of them, including a number of "oh I need to remember to do that" items. I made low-carb jambalaya (substituting grated cauliflower for rice), which turned out pretty tasty. I also opened up a can of tomato paste and portioned the whole thing out into little 1 tablespoon dollops that I froze, instead of using a couple tablespoons and having the rest of it go bad in the fridge! So that feels like an accomplishment. Oh, and last weekend Mom brought a shoebox of tomatoes. I sliced up a couple of them and at them raw, and then made shakshouka out of the rest of them to use them up before they spoiled.

I got all of my tedious chores at work done (typing up QC details to hand off to my student, quarterly report for one of the grants, answering emails that require long essays to respond to properly) and was able to get a good start on building out the last chunk of my analysis framework, so I ended both this week and last feeling pretty good about my progress. Which is good, since I suspect that before I know it it'll be time to start prepping for presentation at conferences, and I'll need to have some results to actually prepare...

Ow

Monday, October 16th, 2017 12:09 am
dglenn: Kickdrum (bass drum) with sneakers on the side legs (kickdrum)
[personal profile] dglenn
Typing passwords from muscle memory with an injured finger sucks. It's a little like remembering a tune from its fingering on one instrument while playing it on a different instrument, but mistakes are physically painful instead of aurally. (And no, I have no idea what I did to the finger, just that even light pressure to the fingertip causes electric-feeling pain to shoot up my arm and moderate pressure makes the pain go all the way to my chest. No visible signs and I didn't have a violent mishap. Strange.)

QotD

Sunday, October 15th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

From the Quotation of the day mailing list, 2014-02-26:

"The late John Greenwood, Q.C, who served as Ontario's Assistant Deputy Attorney General in the late 1970s, had a signature line he used to deliver with a straight face. "Anybody can convict the guilty,' he'd say to visitors to his office, "the trick is to convict the innocent.' People laughed uneasily, sensing it may not be entirely a joke."

-- George Jonas, writing about John Greenwood in the National Post.

[ http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2013/12/05/george-jonas-nigel-wrights-view-of-ottawa/]

(submitted to the mailing list by Z.D. Hora)

QotD

Saturday, October 14th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

If I had a "dollar" for every time I saw someone use quotes for emphasis -- Rex Morgan (@rexm), 2017-09-18 (reacting to this sign, but I'm sure y'all pictured several other examples from memory already)

hadeharia

Friday, October 13th, 2017 07:49 am
prettygoodword: text: words are sexy (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
hadeharia - n., the practice of constantly using "hell" in conversation.


Not a common term. Not sure it's useful either. Not sure of the etymology, but I'm pretty sure that's Hades at the start.

---L.

QotD

Friday, October 13th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"It is error alone which needs the support of government. Truth can stand by itself. Subject opinion to coercion: whom will you make your inquisitors?" -- Thomas Jefferson (b. 1743-04-13, d. 1826-07-04, US President 1801-1809), 1781

Second October 101/1001 Update

Thursday, October 12th, 2017 05:43 pm
grim23: (Default)
[personal profile] grim23
Be true to your work and your word. - Ben Morrow

Goals Completed: 10
Goals in Progress: 36

In my last post, I talked about participating in the Ango, turning inward to a more intense spiritual practice. Ango means, in traditional Japanese, Ango means 'peaceful dwelling' - and I could certainly use that. *smile* The Theme for the Ango this year in the local Zen Temple is 'Exploring the Self', and one is to make a vow of commitment in three of five areas: increased meditation practice, service to the Temple, study of the theme, lessening your personal impact on the Earth, and attending events or workshops.

I will be continuing my increased practice of meditating daily, reading and practicing with the text (Transforming and Healing, by Thich Nhat Hanh) and attending the Five Precepts class (Buddhist ethical living principles). Additionally, I will be speaking with the Zen Monastery for adding a week residency and participating in three days of silence.

[tech] whois behavior?

Thursday, October 12th, 2017 01:23 pm
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
I have a domain for which I don't have any sort of privacy protect - it's for my business, so I have my business info attached to it and am happy to have it public (free advertising!).

But when at the commandline I do whois mydomain.tld the record that comes up is very terse, and has no information about me or how to contact me at all:

   Domain Name: [mydomain.tld]
   Registry Domain ID: [REDACTED]
   Registrar WHOIS Server: whois.enom.com
   Registrar URL: http://www.enom.com
   Updated Date: 2015-10-[REDACTED]
   Creation Date: 2011-10-[REDACTED]
   Registry Expiry Date: 2021-10-[REDACTED]
   Registrar: eNom, Inc.
   Registrar IANA ID: 48
   Registrar Abuse Contact Email:
   Registrar Abuse Contact Phone:
   Domain Status: clientTransferProhibited https://icann.org/epp#clientTransferProhibited
   Name Server: [REDACTED]
   Name Server: [REDACTED]
   DNSSEC: unsigned
   URL of the ICANN Whois Inaccuracy Complaint Form: https://www.icann.org/wicf/


That's what I get from both my mac terminal and the shell at my hosting company.

Adding "--verbose" doesn't change anything.

When I go elsewhere, say to whois.domaintools.com, I get the whole record I expect to see.

What's going on here, does anybody know? Is there some way to convince my local whois to return more full records?

QotD

Thursday, October 12th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"As his name is not 'Biggest Bird', we are to understand that Sesame Street is home to at least one, perhaps more, truly immense unseen birds" -- TOMb, 2017-10-11

[tech, DW] Dreamwidth API Design

Thursday, October 12th, 2017 02:52 am
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
If you want input into Dreamwidth's API, it's under discussion over on [site community profile] dw_dev for imminent development work.

If you have an interest in that, go check it out immediately, and chime in.

[sci, bio] Looking for an Einstein quote

Thursday, October 12th, 2017 12:47 am
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
Years ago, I came across a passage that I seem to recall was attributed to Einstein, from a private letter written to a young mathematician, about how the world is filled with more seductive scientific/mathematical problems than a person can tackle in a lifetime, so one has to be careful to chose the right problems to work on.

I cannot find it; it doesn't seem to be in the books that I had thought I'd seen it in. I'd like to find it again. I tried googling "einstein's letter to mathematician" and discovered that he apparently carried on a voluminous correspondence with every living mathematician at the time. Brute force searching isn't going to work.

Does anybody happen to recognize this passage by description?

On comings-out and transitions

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017 07:25 pm
dglenn: Female (Venus) symbol, with a transistor symbol inside the circle part (TransSister)
[personal profile] dglenn

Thinking about National Coming Out Day. I don't think there's anyone in my life or even kinda near my life who doesn't know that I'm transgender. And a lot of you know that I'm kinky, and some of you may know/remember than I'm polyamorous. (Well, 'ambiamorous' -- I can actually be quite happy in a monogamous relationship or a poly one, depending on whom I'm in the relationship with and how it develops. But I identify more as poly.) I've been "out" about all of that for a long time, even if not everybody has had the last two come up in conversation with me, so it kinda feels like i don't really have anything left to come out about. But maybe I do (though I said some of this in less detail last NCOD). Because several years ago I realized my identity was shifting and I felt a strong mental pressure to start making my body change too.

While many of you met me while I identified as "intergender" (because genderqueer wasn't a label yet when I chose one), my identity is no longer in-the-middle. A lot of folks who've run into me recently have heard this because they've asked -- either because asking about pronouns is a more normal thing nowadays or because they notice changes to my body, or both -- but I'm closer to the F pole on the gender graph than I was, and looking forward to seeing whether this journey carries me all the way there.

So here's my Coming Out Day thing, which (as I mentioned) folks who talk to me one-on-one a lot or have run into me and asked questions already know, but not everybody is up to date on: I have been on HRT for about five years, my pronouns are she/her (though I won't hold a "he" against anyone until I harmonize my gender-presentation with my gender-identity), I am trying to schedule a relevant minor surgery, I'm trying to work up my nerve to shave my beard (which feels like a bigger step than growing breasts or telling people or trying to schedule an orchiectomy), and I'm trying to pick a new name. Some of this is scary, more of it is wonderful, a bunch of it is both. Even though I haven't reached my destination (or figured out for sure what my destination is), that mental pressure to act is greatly reduced since I started taking these steps, my emotions seem to work a lot better on estrogens than androgens, and a lot of "mental static" that I'd gotten used to has gone away. (As Zinnia Jones has pointed out, not all symptoms of gender dysphoria are obviously that, until treating the dysphoria makes them go away.)

I stopped using conventional labels like 'gay'/'het'/'straight' to talk about my orientation a long time ago, and started just saying "attracted to women" and leaving the label as en exercise for the listener ... but did (do) identify as "queer". First because being trans (and especially for being visibly gender-nonconforming) I was already part of the queer community, and again because even though attraction to women didn't feel gay, it didn't quite feel straight either. (Because when my gender was in-between, which was the "opposite gender"? The labels 'bi' or 'pan' would have worked if I had been bi or pan, but I wasn't and AFAICT still am not.) Amusing thing though: I've assumed that most other people mentally tagged me as het, and while HRT did not change my orientation (it can do that, but I've never found out how common or rare it is), changing my gender does mean that the label for my orientation changes.

It's been said that coming out isn't a one-time act, but something that winds up being repeated again and again when meeting new people or joining new groups -- and that goes double for bisexuals and trans people. Like coming-out, transitions are scary and liberating and sometimes difficult ... and there's more than one. Even for a textbook story of a binary gender transition there are medical, legal, and social transitions which may happen at different times and aren't instantaneous. Of those, social transition is the scariest (and generally the most important). And I've already transitioned socially from male to genderqueer years ago, but here I am in the middle (beginning, I guess) of another social transition, from genderqueer to female or mostly-female, in the middle of medical transition, and looking into options & to-do list for legal transition. And y'know? Telling people one on one has been relatively easy (has gotten easier with practice), but standing up to the world and saying, "Here I am, I am changing, this is what I am doing," is a lot harder. So I guess I had something for National Coming Out Day after all.

BTW, what do folks think of the name Eftychia (Ευτυχια, /eff-ti-KHEE-a/ where the χ is sort of between a kh sound and a gh or really-rough-'h' sound)? Still making up my mind, but that one's in the running.

Now you see it too, right?

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017 04:41 pm
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

You ever get a vision stuck in your head in that way that usually only tunes get stuck? I've got one stuck in my brain right now, of a collie or a sheltie, dancing around a herd flock of velociraptors, herding them.

(Feathered, turkey-sized, real velociraptors, not big-ass movie ones.)

Chalk this up to my having just listened to a segment on The Current about necrofauna -- attempts to revive, or create approximations of, extinct species such as the mammoth and the passenger pigeon. (They mentioned dinosaurs as something they'll probably never be able to restore. But then a brief conversation with [info] xpioti got velociraptors stuck in my head anyhow.)

grilse

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017 07:44 am
prettygoodword: text: words are sexy (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
grilse (GRILS) - n., a young Atlantic salmon that has returned to fresh water to spawn after (only) one year.


Yes, there's a word for that: at different points in life cycle, Atlantic salmon are known as parr, smolt, grilse, grilt, kelt, or slink. Grilse are small for adult salmon -- if they wait till their second, third, or fourth year to spawn, the salmon are bigger (and better sport fishing). Dates back to Middle English, of unknown origin, though one dictionary suggests Welsh gleisiad, from glas, blue.

---L.

QotD

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"The closet does have a benefit. It provides safety. Which at times is important. But remember, as long as you are in there, two other things will be too. Fear and shame." -- Anthony Venn-Brown, A Life of Unlearning - a preacher's struggle with his homosexuality, church and faith

[11 October is National Coming-Out Day.]


A good Shemini Atzeret to my friends observing it today, and an especially joyous Simchat Torah to all celebrating that either today or tonight/tomorrow! (And yes, I know what I just said -- 'joyous' + 'simchat' -- is kind of redundant.)

(no subject)

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 10:57 pm
randomdreams: riding up mini slickrock (Default)
[personal profile] randomdreams
I was outside working on some stuff in the workshop, and Monty was sitting on the deck whine/howling at me. It's freezing out there, literally. I'm all "Dog, I have stuff I desperately need to finish!" and she's all "NOOOOOO come in here and let me sleep on your lap" and finally I gave up. She's all smooshed up behind me, between my back and the sofa, but at least she's not shrieking.

I spent a lot of the day chasing a wrapper flaw. Labview can call Windows dll's, through wrapper functions, and someone on our corporate labview development team had miswritten one of a series of nearly identical wrappers. I was talking to the people who wrote the SDK that the wrapper encloses, and they assured me that the SDK worked just fine, so I got to learn how to write my own labview wrappers. Turns out that's surprisingly easy right up until I needed to pass a pointer to an array, and then I was very happy that another person on the labview development team sent me the correct function before I spent another two hours fighting with that process.

(no subject)

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 10:51 pm
randomdreams: riding up mini slickrock (Default)
[personal profile] randomdreams
I had a dream that I no longer have particularly organized in my head, but: I was in an enormous decrepit old building, and the owner of the building pointed out one room that was haunted by a surly, physically aggressive spirit. Like, you went into the room, and if you hung out there very long at all, it started pushing you around and throwing things at you. I, of course, went in there to see, and sure enough, it started pushing me around, but I noticed this absolutely beautiful piano, somewhere in between a studio and a full upright, and played a few notes on it. It was *perfect*, despite the dust: the best-sounding piano I've ever heard. She said "oh, yeah, the spirit tunes it." I was all "this is spectacular. That spirit should tune pianos." The spirit promptly appeared, looking like an elderly Turkish guy (silvery hair, ferocious eyebrows, ferocious moustache) and said he'd be glad to if people would bring them to the room. I figured this would be a way to keep him busy and not pushing people around.

edacious

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 07:59 am
prettygoodword: text: words are sexy (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
edacious (i-DAY-shuhs) - adj., voracious, devouring.


More generally, related to eating, but the connotation of the Latin root, edere, was voracious consumption, and that carried over into English -- in part because of Ovid's line tempus edax rerum, time devours everything. This is a surprisingly late import into English -- first used in 1829, though note that edacity dates from the 1620s.

---L.

QotD

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"Art is the child of nature in whom we trace the features of the mothers face." -- Henry Wadsworth Longfellow [via Goodreads]

October 2017 101/1001 Update

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 12:28 am
grim23: (Darker)
[personal profile] grim23
You are one of the forces of nature. - Jules Michelet


Goals Completed: 10
Goals in Progress: 36

Fall has returned to the Pacific Northwest, and with it more turning inward and reflecting on my life and more healing, both for myself and for my clients. Despite my own preference for being by myself, other people, other priorities, and other activities have kept me from accomplishing those goals as of yet.

I've really not been able to get to the gym and train hard as planned, but I will. I've not been able to train, either. No significant progress with the Body Section of my goals.

In the Mind/Spirit section, I have been meditating daily since the first of October. I've also sat a couple of times of formal Zazen, and I'm likely to get completely caught up tomorrow morning. I will be participating in the Autumn Ango, a 2-month period of more intense meditation practice. I may spend a week again at the Zen Monastery during this time, and I will probably take the Five Precepts class and ceremony. I was going to engage in my yearly fast, but that will have to be delayed a few weeks by other activities I have agreed to attend.

In the Maintenance section, I have upgraded my daily vehicle to a 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee. She'll be able to tow the Whorse, and get around Portland and Oregon when the weather turns icy and snowy. She came with an excellent maintenance record, and a complete inspection and tune-up. Speaking of which, I'm due for a physical exam with my new physician.

In the Zombie section, I have signed up for Winter Fire School in Salem, where I'll spend two days learning about Vehicle Extrication. Carla and I have replaced the degraded decking on Ol' Number 3 with new composite decking that will drain standing water, and be lighter and stronger than the previous plywood deck. I'm hoping to be able to get a company to professionally install solar panels on the new decking before the weather completely turns.

I was able to get one more geocaching day hike with Faye to a mining ghost town in Washington, for a total of 17 one to three-day hikes this year. I may attempt to get three more hikes in to finish this goal.


Imbalance, time
more clarity, truth
pushing boundaries

Season turns to Fall,
revealing the Inner Self
avoid distractions!

Cold and wet weather!
put away the shortsleeves
find jackets and hats

dactylonomy

Monday, October 9th, 2017 07:46 am
prettygoodword: text: words are sexy (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
Should have run this on Friday -- ah, well.


dactylonomy (dak-til-oh-NOH-mee) - n., the art of counting on one's fingers.


Different cultures use different fingering systems for enumerating just up to ten -- and then there are various systems for counting and adding/subtracting after that. Fun stuff. Wikipedia's article is not great, but is still interesting. Coined from Greek daktulos, finger + –nomia, law, used in the sense of an area of knowledge.

---L.

QotD

Monday, October 9th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"Those who educate children well are more to be honored than they who produce them; for these only gave them life, those the art of living well." -- attributed to Aristotle (b. 384 BCE, d. 322 BCE)

[Happy Thinksgiving to my friends in Canada!]

[psych/anthro] Fwd: "We Don't Do That Here"

Monday, October 9th, 2017 01:32 am
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
Via [personal profile] conuly: "We Don't Do That Here", by Aja Hammerly:
I have a handful of “magic” phrases that have made my professional career easier. Things like “you are not your code” and my preferred way to say no: “that doesn’t work for me.” These are tools in my interpersonal skills toolbox. I find myself uttering phrases like, “right or effective, choose one” at least once a week. This week I realized I had another magic phrase, “we don’t do that here.” [...]
Short, highly recommended.

QotD

Sunday, October 8th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"Security to the persons and properties of the governed is so obviously the design and end of civil government, that to attempt a logical proof of it would be like burning tapers at noonday, to assist the sun in enlightening the world; and it cannot be either virtuous or honorable to attempt to support a government of which this is not the great and principal basis; and it is to the last degree vicious and infamous to attempt to support a government which manifestly tends to render the persons and properties of the governed insecure." -- John Hancock (b. 1737-01-23[*], d. 1793-10-08), 1774-03-05

[*] Recorded as 12 January 1736 in the Julian calendar, which England and her colonies used at that time; retconned to the equivalent Gregorian date, 23 Jan. 1747, when the Gregorian calendar was adopted in 1752. See a calendar for September 1752 for the changeover (on a Unix/Linux computer, type "cal 9 1752"). Note that different countries adopted the Gregorian calendar in different years.

QotD

Saturday, October 7th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"Science fiction is no more written for scientists than ghost stories are written for ghosts." -- Brian Aldiss (b. 1925-08-18, d. 2017-08-19), in 1961

siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
I want to amp the signal on this. John Scalzi wrote, a couple days ago, about how this year has been affecting his creative output. Excerpt:
Complicated is not inherently difficult to write. It just takes attention to detail, which normally I’m able to do just fine. When I write on it — when I have those stretches of being able to write — it all works. The plot flows well, the characters are doing their thing, and everything chugs along. What I’m writing is good. There’s just so much less of it than usually happens for me.

I’m not trying to be mysterious about what it is about 2017 that is different. The answer is obvious: Trump is president, and he’s a peevish bigoted incompetent surrounded by the same, and he’s wreaking havoc on large stretches of the American experience, both in his own person and by the chaos he invites. But to say “well, Trump,” is not really to give an answer with regard to what’s different. We’ve had terrible presidents before — George W. Bush springs to mind — and yet my ability to create work was not notably impacted. When Dubya was in office I wrote five novels. The Dubya era was a crappy time for America (recall the wars and the Great Recession) but from the point of view of productivity, it was just fine for me.

The thing is, the Trump era is a different kind of awful. It is, bluntly, unremitting awfulness.
I recommend reading the whole thing, for anybody who has found their productivity impacted. Lots, and lots, and lots, and lots of writers, professional and hobbyist, have come forward to say, "me too".

Me too, me too. My word counts are public, and they speak – well, it's more of a whimper – for themselves. Much of my stress and distraction is personal, familial. But it's also true that the world being on fire is impacting me.

He writes:
It’s hard to focus when the world is on fire, and with novelists in particular, I suspect that sometimes it’s hard to focus when you’ve got the suspicion that your fiction is almost frivolous in the context of what’s going on right now. Well, and maybe it is. But, speaking as someone who spent an hour retweeting pet pictures today to break up the horror of mass shooting news in people’s tweetstreams, sometimes frivolity helps.
To which I would reply with a passage, from a novel, I have quoted before:
"Hazel, we'll have to stop here," said Bigwig, coming up between the panting, crouching bodies of the others. "I know it's not a good place, but Fiver and this other half-sized fellow you've got here–they're pretty well all in. They won't be able to go on if we don't rest."

[...]

Pipkin sat trembling under a fern, his ears drooping on either side of his head. He held one paw forward in an awkward, unnatural way and kept licking it miserably. Fiver was little better off. He still looked cheerful, but very weary. Hazel realized that until they rested they would all be safer where they were than stumbling along in the open with no strength left to run from an enemy. But if they lay brooding, unable to feed or go underground, all their troubles would come crowding into their hearts, their fears would mount and they might very likely scatter, or even try to return to the warren. He had an idea.

"Yes, all right, we'll rest here," he said. "Let's go in among this fern. Come on, Dandelion, tell us a story. I know you're handy that way. Pipkin here can't wait to hear it."

Dandelion looked at Pipkin and realized what it was that Hazel was asking him to do. Choking back his own fear of the desolate, grassless woodland, the before-dawn-returning owls that they could hear some way off, and the extraordinary, rank animal smell that seemed to come from somewhere rather nearer, he began.
And further, from later on:
[Holly] sat up with difficulty and looked around at them.

"You're Hazel, aren't you?" he asked. "And that's– oh, I should know, but I'm in very poor shape, I'm afraid."

"It's Dandelion," said Hazel. "Listen– I can see that you're exhausted, but we can't stay here. We're in danger. Can you come with us to our holes?"

"Captain [Holly]," said Bluebell, "do you know what the first blade of grass said to the second blade of grass?"

Hazel looked at him sharply, but Holly replied, "Well?"

"It said, 'Look, there's a rabbit! We're in danger!'"

"This is no time–" began Hazel.

"Don't silence him," said Holly. "We wouldn't bee here at all without his blue tit's chatter." [...] It took a long time to climb the hill.

[...]

"Hazel," [Dandelion] said, "I thought I ought to come and tell you about Holly. He's much better this evening, but he had a very bad night and so did we. Every time he seemed to be going to sleep, he kept starting up and crying. I thought he was going out of his mind. Pipkin kept talking to him – he was first-rate – and he seems to set a lot of store by Bluebell. Bluebell kept on making jokes. He was worn out before the morning and so were the lot of us – we've been sleeping all day. Holly's been more or less himself since he woke up this afternoon, and he's been up to silflay. [...]"

"Is he fit to talk to us, then?" asked Bigwig.

"I think so. [...]"

[...]

They found Holly with Bluebell and Pipkin, on the turf by the anthill where Dandelion had first looked ovr the down. Holly was sniffing a purple orchis. The head of mauve blooms rocked gently on its stem as he pushed his nose against it.

"Don't frighten it, master," said Bluebell. "It might fly away. After all, it's got a lot of spots to choose from. Look at them all over the leaves."

"Oh, get along with you, Bluebell," answered Holly, good-humoredly.

[...]

Bigwig came up, "I know it's not owl time yet," he said, "but everyone's so eager to hear you, Holly, that they want to go underground at once. Will that suit you?"

"Underground?" replied Holly. "But how can you all hear me underground? I was expecting to talk here."

"Come and see," said Bigwig.

Holly and Bluebell were impressed by the Honeycomb.

"This is something quite new," said Holly. "What keeps the roof up?"

"It doens't need to be kept up," said Bluebell. "It's right up the hill already."

"An idea we found on the way," said Bigwig.

"Lying in a field," said Bluebell. "It's all right, master, I'll be quiet while you're speaking."

"Yes, you must," said Holly. "Soon no one will want jokes."

[...]

"[...] Men never hurry, do they? Then one of them got a spade and began filling in the mouths of all the holes he could find. Every hole he came to, he cut out the turf above and pushed it into the hole. That puzzled me, because with ferrets they want to drive the rabbits out. But I was expecting that they'd leave a few holes open and net them: although that would have been a foolish way to ferret, because a rabbit that went up a blocked run would be killed underground and then the man wouldn't get his ferret back very easily, you know."

"Don't make it to grim, Holly," said Hazel, for Pipkin was shuddering at the thought of the blocked run and the pursuing ferret.

"Too grim?" replied Holly bitterly. "I've hardly started yet. Would anyone like to go away?" No one moved and after a few moments he continued.

[...*]

"After that we had the worst time of all. If it hadn't had been for Bluebell's jokes and chatter we'd have stopped running[**] for certain."

"Hraka one end, jokes the other," said Bluebell. "I used to roll a joke along the ground and we both followed it. That was how we kept going."
Watership Down, Richard Adams, from the chapters "A Honeycomb and a Mouse" and "For El-Ahrairah to Cry".

* Elided: the famous part about what happened to Sandleford Warren, which, when people say seeing the movie as children traumatized them, is the part they're talking about.

** A euphemism previously established.

[psych, ling/eng] "Hlep"?

Friday, October 6th, 2017 02:09 pm
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
Is there a canonical discussion of the meaning of "hlep"/"hlepy"/"hlepiness" as per usage on Making Light? I can't find anything. Can anybody point me in the right direction?

I think I've got a history of sorts. Apparently it was introduced to ML in 2007 with this comment. Responding to this (note #481, not #480 as she says) by user Bruce E. Durocher II:
After all this OS talk I have to gripe about something and ask if there's a polite term for it. Here's the setup: [...story...] My question is this: is there a term in English for well meaning advice that gives you the urge to walk out the backdoor, aim your face to the sky, and scream YOU'RE NOT HELPING! or do I need to start checking Yiddish and German dictionaries again?
user Lurking Maggie wrote (September 15, 2007, 02:44 PM):
#480, Bruce E. Durocher II: I'm delurking because I've actually used the word "hlep" to describe that phenomenon. It's superficially like help, it's meant to be help, but it totally fails to be actual help.

I'm sure this comment has been very hlepful.
It apparently didn't actually catch on until around 2011 or so, when user Bruce E. Durocher II re-introduced it in this Open Thread of June 2011, in which the term and several alternative terms are discussed in brief. At that point it seems to have caught on.

Since then, it seems there's been some shift in meaning. Originally it was specifically instructions – as an answer to a request for help – that don't actually address the problem meaningfully. The elided example above was Bruce E. Durocher II's asking someone how to get some videos to play on his Mac and being told to install Linux. Since then, it's broadened out to include into unsolicited "have you tried" suggestions, such as the unsolicited and often very unwelcome suggestions for remedies people with serious illnesses get (e.g. "have you tried drinking green tea for your cancer?"); and, if I understand correctly, even further beyond that, beyond the merely verbal responses to any behavior that is presented as "helpful" but which betrays an unconcern for whether it actually helps the ostensible beneficiary, e.g. doing someone the "favor" of doing their laundry, only damaging the clothes in the process – and not caring that the clothes were damaged.

Anybody know of a canonical definition or discussion?

Asking for, like, all my patients.

lateritious

Friday, October 6th, 2017 07:45 am
prettygoodword: text: words are sexy (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
lateritious (lat-uh-RISH-uhs) - adj., of, resembling, or having the color of red brick.


There's a word for brick-red -- a Latinate one, no less: adopted in the 1650s from Latin laterīcius, from later, brick + an adjectival ending denoting a material.

---L.

QotD

Friday, October 6th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (cyhmn)
[personal profile] dglenn

"Spring passes and one remembers one's innocence.
 Summer passes and one remembers one's exuberance.
 Autumn passes and one remembers one's reverence.
 Winter passes and one remembers one's perseverance."

  -- Yoko Ono

Turkish Walnut Chicken and Mustardy Coleslaw

Thursday, October 5th, 2017 11:01 pm
dr_tectonic: (füd)
[personal profile] dr_tectonic
I'm annoyed with myself for having low productivity at work and yet also staying late. The problem is that I'm working on a project (tallying up formatting fixes to hand off to my student) that is tedious and chore-like, requires attention to detail, and involves a number of steps that take several minutes for the computer to crunch through. So once I get step five out of eleventy running I go off to do something else while I'm waiting, except it can't be anything that requires thought or I'll lose track of what I'm doing, so I dink around on Facebook or play a little game or something and then when it's time to switch back I've lost all my momentum and have to re-motivate myself. Oh, and half the time when I get one step further in the whole process, I find a new thing to fix and then I need to start all over again to make sure I'm not missing anything.

So I came home this evening feeling all antsy and decided to try cooking something new to see if that would help. I think it did.

I got a full set of TIME-LIFE "Foods of the World" books from my Mom, and now and again I pull one out to skim through at bedtime. The Middle Eastern Cooking book has a Turkish recipe for chicken with walnut sauce which looked intriguing, so I thought I'd give that a try. (I also threw together a batch of mustardy coleslaw while I was waiting for the stock to cook down using a recipe I improvised a few weeks ago and liked enough to write down.) The chicken turned out well, and I think I will make it again. It's tasty, different, pretty simple to make, and not overly carb-tastic. I think it'd make a good potluck dish.

Circassian Chicken )


Mustardy Coleslaw )
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