QotD

Sunday, March 26th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"The support I received from CIA draws a damning contrast to the treatment of other transgender Americans. If trans soldiers can serve in Afghanistan and Iraq, and LGBT intelligence officers can risk their lives hunting terrorists, why are trans teens like Gavin Grimm still fighting in court for the right to pee? If Langley and the Pentagon can use common sense—letting transmen use the men's room and transwomen the ladies' -- surely a school district can figure it out." -- Jenny Hall, "Coming Out as Transgender Made Me a More Effective CIA Officer", The Atlantic, 2017-03-20

QotD

Saturday, March 25th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"gender is just a social construct"
"so is language"
"what do you mean?"
"sorry, did you say something?"

  -- tja thurman, 2017-03-20

[31 March is the annual International Transgender Day of Visibility. The week's quotes will sortakinda have a theme.]

So I’m Two Hours Into Mass Effect, And…

Friday, March 24th, 2017 12:14 pm
theferrett: (Meazel)
[personal profile] theferrett

I can see where it’s getting the “meh” reviews.

Because I love the backstory of the new Mass Effect.  It’s a great sci-fi story with a lot of room to maneuver, classic space opera – and it feels big.

I just don’t see how I connect with it.

Like, as an example: an early mission has you scanning walls to find enough evidence to stop a saboteur – your standard “Find the foozle” quest, wrapped in a story to make it compelling.  And you scan enough evidence, and the trail leads you to your saboteur.

Except the game says, “Wait!  That’s not the saboteur!  The real saboteur is trying to frame these two people!”

Which is a great twist, if I the player had any decision in that process.  If there had been some evidence I could have overlooked where I might have accidentally jailed an innocent person, thus having to make the hard decision of putting away someone who claims they didn’t do it, that would be dramatic!  Maybe I could do the wrong thing by mistake!  But literally your AI buddy kicks in to go “WHOAH, NOPE, YOU GOT MORE WORK TO DO.”

And so the tension is defanged.

Then you find the real saboteur, who is mildly angry about how the previous administration did his family wrong.  But again, the game doesn’t ask you to take sides – the guy doesn’t even tell you what the new administration did except in really abstract terms.  And you don’t even get a chance to let him go, or try to talk him out of his deadly saboteur nature, as far as I can tell from the dialogue options – either way, he’s meekly caught, even though you’re just one dude and you didn’t bring any security and I guess the game didn’t feel like ending this mission with a chase or a battle or a dramatic emotional decision or anything.

So my reaction at the end is, “Uh, well, I guess some people are angry at the government.”  But I don’t feel it.  I’m not invested in any of these schmucks because while it’s a great story, Mass Effect seems to have forgotten to add the decision points that get me involved.

I could have jailed the wrong person, thus getting mad at those fiendish saboteurs.

I could have been asked to side with the saboteur thanks to the righteousness of his cause.

I could have been presented with a chase sequence to stop some suicidal madman.

But instead, I got railroaded along a series of decisions that weren’t actually decisions.  And if Mark Rosewater has taught me anything, games are about interesting choices.  If I ask you, “So do you want this magical wand of destruction at to fight with, or this stubby pencil?”, that decision is automatic for everyone but the people who want to make it purposely hard.

“Do you want to continue this quest or not?” is not an interesting decision.

The decisions in Mass Effect thus far aren’t interesting.  The story is interesting, on a meta level.  But I am not given an access point so I personally am invested in what happens.

I mean, it’s still fun.  I like levelling up.  But if these guys want me to care more, they need to have less people telling me, “Oh, here’s a gout of backstory” and more of me making emotional decisions based on that backstory.  And until now, there’s a whole lot of people telling me how they feel and very little of me deciding how I should feel.

 

Cross-posted from Ferrett's Real Blog.

mundungus

Friday, March 24th, 2017 07:51 am
prettygoodword: (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
mundungus (mun-DUN-guhs) - n., (obs.) tripe, offal; (arch.) a cheap, foul-smelling tobacco.


Adopted in the first sense in 1641 from Spanish mondongo, tripe/entrails, and extended to the tobacco the next century. And yes, this is the origin of Mundungus Fletcher from Harry Potter.

And that wraps up a week of M words. Will another theme week start up again Monday? -- stay tuned!

---L.

QotD

Friday, March 24th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"The radical of one century is the conservative of the next. The radical invents the views. When he has worn them out, the conservative adopts them." -- Mark Twain (pen name of Samuel Clemens, b. 1835-11-30, d. 1910-04-21), Mark Twain's Notebook (pub. 1935)

[Thanks to [info] - personal fidhle for calling this to my attention after he saw it at DK.]

QotD

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"Let me be clear: nationalism and patriotism are not the same thing. It's vital we differentiate between the two." -- Kamala Harris, 2017-02-17

"Man if only they taught this in high school wait I think they teach in high school It's the WWI unit" -- Bryant Francis, (reply)

On Surveys

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017 12:26 am
dr_tectonic: (Default)
[personal profile] dr_tectonic
So the Chapman University Survey of American Fears. It's a thing. Someone on an email list I'm on ranted that the facts that 10% of respondents reported being afraid of zombies and that 32% agreed with a question about the government suppressing information about a fictitious event meant that people are stupid and ignant. My reply turned long, so here ya go.


Dude, come on. That's not even remotely what the poll results mean.

The only thing that you can say with certainty that the first result means is that, if you ask a bunch of random strangers who have no particular reason to give you deep and honest insights into their soul to spend half an hour filling out an incredibly long and detailed online poll (88 different topics, many with followups!) about an intimately personal subject (what makes you afraid), and, after asking about a whole bunch of other potentially scary things, you ask "are zombies scary?", about 10% will click "yeah, sure, zombies are scary."

Does that mean that some people genuinely worry about the dead coming back to life? I suppose there are probably a few such folks out there. But it could mean "I know it's just fiction, but the idea of zombies totally wigs me out." Or "Yeah, zombie movies are my go-to when I want to feel scared!"

It could also mean "Jesus, how long is this damn survey?" Or "Lol, they're asking if people are afraid of zombies. I'm totally gonna say yes to that." Or even "I just click randomly on these polls because the faster I click the faster I get to the incentive."

Similarly, if you ask a question that is predicated on a false premise but has answers that reflect a particular stance or affiliation, sometimes people will pick the answer that reaffirms their identity rather than the one that accurately represents, in a strict sense, their beliefs about the real world.

Sometimes (often, even) people will be confused by the mismatch between the question and their knowledge of current and historical events, and will pick an answer based on misremembered details. Sometimes people will be unsure of their knowledge, and will pick an answer using the question itself as a source of information. Sometimes people will answer the hypothetical presumed by the question.

And sometimes people will get annoyed that the poll is asking stupid questions that are wrong, turn contrary, and say "Yes! Yes I do think the government is hiding fictional things from me! Stupid poll!"

I find none of these things to be cause for shock, alarm, concern, or dismay, let alone weeping.

I mean, think about answering that poll yourself. The first thing I ask is "well, what do they mean by 'afraid'"? Is finding something troublesome or worrying the same as being afraid of it? If I think something is really super-duper-scary, but I think the odds of it actually affecting me are very low, does that make me slightly, somewhat, or very afraid of it? What if I'm only scared of the thing under certain circumstances? I wouldn't even know how to interpret my own answers to this survey, let alone a whole group of people's!

In my opinion, the only way to get useful insights from survey results like these is to look at them relative to one another. People are a lot more afraid of credit card fraud than they are of being mugged. That's possibly informative when it comes to criminal policy. People fear losing their jobs or losing all their data about as much as they fear heights and spiders. That sort of calibrates different kinds of fear against one another, which seems sociologically interesting.

But the absolute numbers are close to meaningless, and basing a supercilious "lookit all these stoopid muggles" rant on them is not a flattering look. Be better than that.

middlescence

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017 07:39 am
prettygoodword: (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
middlescence (mid-l-ES-uhns) - n., the middle-age period of life, especially when considered a difficult time of self-doubt and readjustment.


Or, the mid-life crisis considered as a watershed equivalent to adolescence. Adjectival form is middlescent. Coined in 1965 as a portmanteau of middle + adolescence.

---L.

People Have A Right To Be Stupid.

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017 10:38 am
theferrett: (Meazel)
[personal profile] theferrett

One of the running responses to yesterday’s discussion of female attraction was that women frequently fall for handsome assholes. I can’t really debate that. Those of y’all who remember The Wolf’s abuse will recall that he was propelled into the spotlight in part based on Hot Abs and in part based on a cadre of women who really wanted to get Wolfucked. (And yes, unbelievably, that was an actual term.)

However, I will also note that men frequently fall for women who are also completely wrong for them. They see a pretty girl, they sand off all the potentially-conflicting bits of their personalities to try to masquerade as what this pretty girl wants, idolizing away all her manifest flaws because she’s got a curvaceous figure – and then wind up miserable because “OH MY GOD I WAS SUCH A NICE GUY AND WOMEN DON’T LIKE NICE GUYS.”

Turns out “making riotously bad decisions” isn’t confined to one gender. Whoops.

Look, there are people making terrible decisions all over the damn world. And the sad thing is, you gotta let them make those awful decisions.

People have a right to ruin their own lives.

Part of that is because often, the people who want to “rescue” people from bad decisions actually just want them to make equally bad decisions that benefit them. The guys who are lamenting about womens’ bad decisions are, quite predictably, hoping that these broken women will take a deep and meaningful consolation from their penis. You’ll see spouses and family members shouting, “You can’t leave me? Where would you go!” when what they really mean is “I’m dependent on you and you abandoning my abuse would inconvenience me!”

Part of that is because often, the “bad decisions” people make are only bad from an outside perspective – the born-again Christian mother who’s convinced her daughter living in sin must be miserable because she would be miserable. The cis dudebro who’s convinced his trans friend must be transitioning out of a need for attention. The vanilla girlfriend who’s convinced her boyfriend’s need to be beaten bloody means they’re on the path to suicide. You know, people who just don’t get it.

But the main reason is simple: the people who bear the brunt of the consequences for their awful decisions are the only folks who should get to make them.

(It gets a little more complicated in interdependent situations, of course, particularly if your 50/50 rent roommate decides to quit her job to become a professional sparrow-raiser, but in the end you’re the one who can probably scrounge up a new place to live when her broke ass cannot.)

I am a fan of disseminating information. I’ve spoken at length of the known dangers of the one-penis policy. I’ve talked about the myriad ways in which polyamory enables abusers. I’ve discussed how men can be bad to women, and women to men, and people to people.

But in the end, if someone’s making a bad decision, that’s on them.

Maybe it’ll work out. Sometimes things do – because other people didn’t understand what you needed, or because of dumb luck. (I had unsafe sex with better than 50 women in my slutty 20s, and every test I’ve taken indicates I picked up no known STIs from it. I took a really insanely dumb risk, and yet I wouldn’t advise you to play the STI lottery and hope the odds are ever in your favor.)

But you gotta let ’em go.

Yeah. People make staggeringly dumb decisions all the time. It’s a truth of life. But the question has to be, “Why are you so attracted to these people who make staggeringly dumb decisions?” Why are you spending your time chasing stupid people who aren’t interested in you in the hopes that one day they’ll change their mind?

Isn’t that a pretty staggeringly bad decision on your own?

I can’t stop you from making that decision, of course. Not my tempo. But I can at least raise the question that maybe you could be looking for partners who aren’t looking to date people you despise.

Just a suggestion.

You are free, of course, to ignore it.

Cross-posted from Ferrett's Real Blog.

QotD

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"There is a thread of cultural reality in the U.S. that I think most Europeans don't see: the rural/urban split is not just about farmland and sidewalk, or even about the simple economic issues involved in the same split in, say, England.

"When it comes to social issues, different parts of America are living at different points in history. You can almost literally engage in time travel by moving around the country."

-- Elliott Mason, March 2017

"It's not about any actual trans people, or their safety. It's about fighting over whose vision of America should win: a remembered prosperity we must strain to reach anew, or a step forward from existing problems into an ever-more-just and ever-stronger future." -- ibid.

mallee

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017 08:41 am
prettygoodword: (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
mallee (MAL-ee) - n., any of various shrubby, multiple-stemmed eucalyptuses of southern Australia; a brushwood of same; (as "the mallee") the bush.


There are a few dozen species of mallee. There are multiple places of mallee. The mallee is more vague. Adopted around 1845 from an aboriginal Australian word, probably Wemba-Wemba (spoken in northwestern Victoria) mali.

---L.
theferrett: (Meazel)
[personal profile] theferrett

“The fact that a behavior is considered harassment or not based solely on how attractive {the women} find you is bullshit.”

This is a comment I hear often, usually from dudes with ugly personalities. Because they’re awful at knowing when and how to approach women for a date, they instead decide that “picking up women” is entirely about looks that they don’t have, and not about a personality that they could potentially cultivate.

The truth is this: knowing when a woman doesn’t want to talk to you is, in fact, part of the process.

The fact that dudes are whining, “Well, you’d probably like me if I’d spoken to you when you actually wanted to be spoken to!” as though it’s some grievously unfair principle of the universe is proof that they’re missing the fundamental point of the discussion.

Look, I am a catastrophic nerd. I have original RPG art framed on the wall of my living room. I go to RPG conventions specifically to geek out about roleplaying….

And still there are annoying people who bug the crap out of me by yammering on about their anime campaign when I’m just in line trying to get a sandwich, man.

These are people who don’t read the signs that I’m not interested right now. They don’t talk with me so much as they open up a fire hydrant of their interests, drenching me in overexplanations about things I’ve told them I already understand, blithely assuming that I know the fine details of the Dark Sun setting when I’ve said I’ve never played, cornering me wherever they can trap me and blathering on.

And a fundamental truth is this: knowing when and where to open up a discussion is part of why people will or will not like you. I love RPGs, I love nerds, I’m at a place specifically to find fellow RPG nerds, and yet even with all those advantages there are still wrong approaches.

As such, attractive women sitting in public are not quest-givers in a World of Warcraft game, signaling the start of mission “GET INTO THEIR PANTS” – some do want to be talked to, others do not, and still others only want to be talked to about certain things. Figuring out which ones are amenable to which conversations is the actual mission if you’re out to find someone to smooch.

Reading body language to know when someone has zero interest in talking to you is part of the process of dating women. If you’re not a Herculean specimen of bohunk physicality (and note that I am not), then discovering those levers and working them to the best of your ability should be your primary focus.

(And for the record, “Being a Herculean specimen of bohunk physicality” is not a universal access point when it comes to picking up a woman, either. The guys who bitch endlessly about how “it’s all about looks” generally settle on “a buff movie-star look” as the sole thing that All Women Would Never Call Harassment. But some women prioritize skinny paper-pale geeks, and other women long for pudgy biker dudes, and some women are, you know, gay. So maybe calm down on the idea that all you have to do is look like Ryan Gosling and nobody will ever call you on your shit? Because looking like Ryan Gosling would help your odds, but it ain’t a guarantee either.)

Anyway. Acting as though every communication should be identically well-reacted to is the inane logic of someone who doesn’t realize they’re arguing that you should be flattered by every robocall, should be thrilled rather than annoyed by spam, should be overjoyed when your boss tells you they want you to work an extra three hours tonight because ZOMG IT’S SO UNFAIR THAT YOUR BOSS HAS TO BRING YOU GOOD NEWS BEFORE YOU LIKE THEM.

And if it strikes you as burningly unfair that a woman is happy to talk with someone who approaches them with things they feel they might enjoy, and is unhappy when someone they don’t like forces an interaction upon them, then I’m gonna suggest that the real unfairness here is you. Because what you’re actually saying is, “It is unfair that I can’t do what I like and have everybody love me.”

Top tip: if the message you’re quietly putting out to everyone is “I wish you’d all stop wanting things so I can get some sex,” don’t be surprised when people don’t want to date you. Because if you’re expressing outrage when someone asks “What’s in it for me?”, you’re actually telling them there’s really not much there.

(EDIT: And because people keep sailing past the point I was trying to make, the point is not that “Handsome men don’t get more slack,” because of course they often do, but rather “The fact that women want to talk to people they find attractive is not unfair.”

(Unless these guys would find it somehow “fairer” for everyone – including them – to be forced to date people they personally find unattractive, what’s actually being said when once you dig underneath that cry of “That’s not fair!” is a version of “It’s unfair that women can’t be forced to tolerate people they don’t actually want to interact with so I can fuck them.” And yeah. Zero surprise that this approach is not met with positive feedback by women.)

Cross-posted from Ferrett's Real Blog.

QotD

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn
@StripeyCaptain:  "Oddly, they never seem to want testing for anyone who gets more than a couple of grand a month from the state."
@tjathurman:  "I think they're worried about a mythical beast called The Undeserving Poor."
@StripeyCaptain:  "No one deserves to be poor. Oh right, that's not what they meant..."

-- Tigerfort and tja thurman (@StripeyCaptain and @tjathurman), 2017-03-20

Recent Tweets of Note

Monday, March 20th, 2017 11:17 pm
flwyd: (mail.app)
[personal profile] flwyd
I've been using Twitter a lot more lately. Here are some clever things I've said that are worth repeating. I also set up a perl6 script to post a #quotefile quip every day.
  • A smile is a hammock for your face
  • I tried to order an extra large T-shirt from Rome. I received forty shirts.
  • Bitcoin is a commodity whose foundation is the artificial scarcity of numbers.
  • When @realDonaldTrump said he'd drain the swamp he didn't tell us that the effluent would flow into the Potomac and then into Chesapeake Bay (re: this story)
  • Chuck Berry transported listeners to a simpler world where we pursued our crushes, drove fast cars, and the week ended with a rockin' dance.
  • Imma let you finish @NCAA, but the March Hare and Mad Hatter are the best #MarchMadness team of all time. #DownTheBasketHole
  • The 2010s surge in white nationalism is in large part a reaction to a century of white internationalism.
  • Hypothesis: Trump thinks girls have cooties. (re: not shaking Angela Merkel's hand)
  • Odd that we live in a culture that stigmatizes seeing a psychologist but not seeing a pastor. They do similar work with different specialities.
  • If your house is too big of a landslide risk you can in theory get a new house. If you have a chronic disease you can't move to a new body. (re: America's model of health insurance)
  • Sets to the left of me, sets to the right / Here I am, stuck in the middle with ∪ / #MathHumor
  • alice@rabbithole> cd wonderland
    alice@rabbithole> ls
    DRINKME
    EATME
    README
    alice@rabbithole >
  • When you gaze into the void, the social media ranking algorithm answers back.
  • The tyranny of Daylight Saving Time is not that you lose an hour of sleep or an hour of sun. It's that you let a clock decide when you act.
  • More people lived in Kentucky in 2010 than lived in the US in 1790. Constitutional suspicion of federal power should apply to state gov't too.
  • I'm more confused reading #Perl6 docs as an experienced programmer than Learning Perl as a novice: "Why'd you make the sausage that way?"
  • Don't defend the status quo. Describe a better system and work to make it happen. Legislators gonna legislate–ensure they enact your vision.
  • Regardless of the benefits of "like a business" governing, Trump's management style isn't fit for leading a country.
  • None of us are as strong as all of us are.
  • Best part so far of a two-week liquid+purée diet? Eating a bowl full of mayonnaise. #TastyRecovery (later that day, my stomach regretted that decision)
  • A good approach to cleaning up public discourse on the Internet: you must listen before you speak. (re: a Norwegian news website's new policy)
  • There are no high-paying jobs at family ethnic restaurants, but it's a crucial role played by immigrants. #JointAddress (re: proposed immigration policies that focus on high-paying tech jobs)
  • For every war we start, we must end two more.
  • The best way to stop drugs from coming into America is to grow marijuana in the U.S. #JointAddress
  • Key change in gay marriage support was folks knowing more gay people. Let's create opportunities for Americans to meet ordinary scientists.
  • Biologists are pro-birth, pro-life, and pro-death.
  • Framing: refugees and immigrants are freedom seekers. They're willing to give up even home and family ties to pursue American values.
  • Freedom isn't free. It's made possible by hard work and generous support from taxpayers like you.
  • Hapless Hank wanted to be the "go to programmer", but instead became the goto programmer.
  • Don't want to be subject to any government? 2000+ sqkm between Egypt and Sudan are claimed by neither.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bir_Tawil
  • Honk if you fly south for the winter.
  • “I'm not racist, I have black friends!” “This bill isn't homophobic, several closeted legislators voted for it!”
  • I don't declare war on xenophobia. I declare peace. May it rest there.
  • It's a travesty that America will have to navigate the era of alternate facts without George Carlin
  • You can't keep evil out of a country; it doesn't travel on a plane. Evil casts its spores through ideas, sown in a heart fertilized by hate.
  • Don't just make art. Be art.
  • Humans are my ingroup.
  • Obama sought dissenting opinions and input from experts. Trump surrounds himself with like-minded people and thinks he knows everything.
  • Hey @POTUS, while you're making it harder to hire foreign workers, please invest in US education system so there are good Americans to hire.
  • Halal food in NYC doesn't come in meal deals. It's Allah carte.
  • If I told you that you tested positive for antibodies, would you hold them against me?
  • Flotsam and jetsam are the mass noun equivalents of odds and ends.
  • Pancakes crêpe me out.
  • Just to keep things surreal @realDonaldTrump should nominate Hillary Clinton for Secretary of State. She's got experience and is unemployed.
  • Strange times when a populace, concerned about decades of job loss, votes in a president whose catchphrase was “You‘re fired”
  • Folks advocating for unfaithful electors in next month's electoral college have moved past shock, denial, and anger and are on to bargaining
  • Two generations ago, GOP was the party of education, business, & taking blacks for granted; Dems the party of labor & southern xenophobia.
  • 2020 campaign promise: free electoral college tuition for all Americans
  • To tap into the wisdom of the crowd, maybe pollsters should ask respondents who they think will win their state and the electoral college.
  • Next time can we choose the greater of two goods?
  • To pay a parking ticket, I have to click "Add to Basket" as if I went to the Municipal Justice Store and browsed around for a nice citation.
  • Maybe Republicans would get serious about #climatechange if we called it "Recapitalizing snow and ice banks."
  • "Wake of the Flood" was the tidal track of the Grateful Dead's 1973 album. #pun
  • Atlas Hugged, in which John Galt attends Burning Man.
  • What do you call a really cute cephalopod? Squeed!
  • I know I'm not going to eat half the food I bring to @burningman. I just wish I knew which half.
  • I'm into second-order psychedelics. I don't take drugs myself, but I thoroughly enjoy consuming the output of those who do.
  • When God closes a door He goes to the window, opens it, sticks His head out & yells “I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore!”
  • Thank you Mario, but the princess is the protagonist in her own feature film!
  • Mallard abduckted. Fowl play suspected. #terrible #pun

mousseron

Monday, March 20th, 2017 07:43 am
prettygoodword: (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
It just so happens I ALSO have a bunch of M-words in a row up next. So here's another theme week!


mousseron - n., an eminently edible mushroom with a flattish white cap.


In English this refers to Marasmius oreades, also known as Scotch Bonnet and the fairy ring mushroom, the latter confusingly as there are several other species, both edible and toxic, that also grow in fairy rings. In French, from which we got the word, it seems to refer instead to Calocybe gambosa, known in English as St. George's mushroom, which is also quite edible (especially when fried in butter) but has a different taste and texture (not as sweet, for one thing). The French name comes from Old French mousseron, from Vulgar Latin/Late Latin mussariōnem (or conjectural form *mussariō), probably of pre-Roman origin.

---L.
theferrett: (Meazel)
[personal profile] theferrett

I’m in the final stages of editing a complex book which prominently features two disabled characters, and I’d like to hire someone who is wheelchair-enabled who can tell me whether I’m making any obvious insults and/or errors to wheelchair-enabled users.   It’s a 95,000 word manuscript, and the pay isn’t magnificent but it’s about 6% of what I got paid for the book after agent’s cut, et al.  If you can give me actual feedback on the book itself, all the better.  Turnaround time would be 4-6 weeks, preferably for someone who’s done professional critiquing/sensitivity reading before.

If interested, please email me at theferrett@theferrett.com with the header “Sensitivity Reader,” so you don’t get lost in spam, with your qualifications.

(And yes, I am aware of Writing In The Margins’ Sensitivity Reader index, which is an excellent resource I’d recommend to those looking to ensure that they’re not accidentally elbowing people in the face with hoary cliches and/or botched details on the life of marginalized people.  I’m just seeing if there’s anyone who I know/knows me who’d want the job first.)

Cross-posted from Ferrett's Real Blog.

QotD

Monday, March 20th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"Saying that health coverage is a consumer choice makes health care a commodity, something that can be traded, bartered or sold on the open market. Catholic social teaching is clear that health care is not a commodity; it is not a bundle of services available to the highest bidder. Health care is a fundamental human right -- Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI used those very words -- alongside water, food and education. Providing health care is among those rights that the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church says 'every nation is required in duty to make towards a true worldwide cooperation for the common good of the whole of humanity and for future generations.'

"Providing health care to our citizens isn’t a matter of choice, it is a duty, an obligation. [...]"

-- editorial, National Catholic Reporter, 2017-03-18

[Spring (technically) is almost here -- about an hour after the cron daemon posts this for me. A happy equinox to everyone marking it, especially to folks celebrating it as a religious holiday! For the rest of us, hopes and good weather to come.]

QotD

Sunday, March 19th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

From the Quotation of the day mailing list, 2017-01-14:

"Whether we gain or not by this habit of profuse communication it is not for us to say." -- Virginia Woolf, in Jacob's Room (1922).

(submitted to the mailing list by Terry Labach)

Conservative and Progressive Education

Saturday, March 18th, 2017 07:48 pm
flwyd: (Trevor glowing grad macky auditorium)
[personal profile] flwyd
We have forgotten that the proper function of the school is to transmit the cultural heritage of one generation to the next generation, and so to make them capable of absorbing ancient learning and applying it to the problem of its own day.
– Barry Goldwater, The Conscience of a Conservative, “Some Notes on Education”

Senator Goldwater expressed many points of view in The Conscience of a Conservative which I approach from a very different perspective, yet perhaps none as concisely as this one. He wrote this passage in the context of arguing that the federal government should divest itself entirely of involvement in education, leaving the matter instead to states and local school districts.

The transmission of cultural heritage from generation to generation happens naturally and effectively in the home, at religious and social gatherings, and as young folks interact with their communities. The unique value offered by a school is the opportunity for children and young adults to learn ideas and techniques which were unavailable to their parents. A child sent to boarding school in the 1820s might return as the first person in the history of the family who could read. A young man in 1870 who went off to a land grant college could return home two to four years later and teach his father and their neighbors newly developed techniques in farming. In 1900, a student could leave a town without electricity and pursue a degree as an electrical engineer, learning things in his senior year which were not known to the world when he arrived as a freshman.[1] And in the 1980s and 1990s, my generation played with computers in our public school classrooms and went on to teach our parents, with varying levels of success, how to use the most crucial tool of the modern age.

Goldwater makes clear that he is arguing against John Dewey and progressive education:
Subscribing to the egalitarian notion that every child must have the same education, we have neglected to provide an educational system which will tax the talents and stir the ambitions of our best students and which will thus insure us the kind of leaders we will need in the future.
In our desire to make sure that our children learn to “adjust” to their environment, we have given them insufficient opportunity to acquire the knowledge that will enable them to master their environment.
Earlier in the book, Goldwater said that he was in favor of school integration (I believe that it is both wise and just for negro children to attend the same schools as whites, and that to deny them this opportunity carries with it strong implications of inferiority) but he didn't think the federal government should bring it about (I believe that the problem of race relations… is best handled by the people directly concerned.). The belief that integration is desirable, yet it's fine if entrenched state political interests deny it, can be easily understood when Goldwater explains that his interest in schools is for the development of future leaders–and the unspoken conclusion that black children in the South would not be the future leaders of those states.

In the intervening half century the Dewey educational position, particularly the emphasis on adaptation to a changing world rather than mastering a static one, has been held widely in colleges and universities. Deans and chancellors are likely to craft mottoes like “preparing students for the challenges of tomorrow” and liberal arts departments emphasize that they teach critical thinking, not just classic knowledge. Yet in many locales primary school (which answers much more directly to local and state political pressure) is shifting away from a path where each generation knows more than their parents, requiring instead that children be taught the same misconceptions that their parents believe. The designated future leaders, of course, are still afforded access to accurate facts through private schools, thanks to their parents’ ability to succeed, whether through a privileged position or personal skill. One of the biggest failings of public education in the last two generations is that it’s funded and run at the local level while the rich and middle class have fled integrated areas, taking their tax revenue and school board engagement away from areas with poverty and students of color and into suburbs with higher school ratings. (There's a great two part piece from This American Life on this topic.)

[1] I’m using male pronouns in this discussion because secondary education was at that time overwhelmingly meant for men, another major failing of the traditional approach of schools whose goals were to educate a pre-screened set of future leaders.

QotD

Saturday, March 18th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"In the beginning, God created man, but seeing him so feeble, He gave him the cat." -- Warren Eckstein

Photobucket

Friday, March 17th, 2017 02:41 pm
karzilla: a green fist above the word SMASH! (Default)
[staff profile] karzilla posting in [site community profile] dw_maintenance
Thanks to everyone who let us know that Photobucket images were not loading properly on some pages. The problem seemed to be mostly limited to HTTPS requests; Dreamwidth maintains a list of known high-traffic image sites that support HTTPS, so that our secure content proxy service doesn't cache them unnecessarily. Unfortunately Photobucket seems to have recently changed their site configuration such that HTTPS requests aren't being served as expected, and we've now taken it out of our list of "proxy-exempt" sites.

If you continue to have issues, make sure you're not using HTTPS Photobucket links. It's a bit counterintuitive, but if you use HTTP instead, it will be automatically transformed on our end to an HTTPS link that uses p.dreamwidth.org.

Hope that clears everything up for now! Let us know if it doesn't...

slade

Friday, March 17th, 2017 07:42 am
prettygoodword: (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
slade (SLAYD) - n., (Eng. dialect) an open space between banks (a small valley) or woods (a glade).


Also sometimes a deeper valley like a ravine, and sometimes the hillside itself, and sometimes a peat-spade or a part of a plow. This one dates back to Old English slæd, where it had both the valley and glade senses, now surviving only in a few regional dialects of England.

That wraps up the week of S words. Onward to next week!

---L.

QotD

Friday, March 17th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"We live in interesting times. That's not a good thing. I like to read adventure stories, but I don't like to live them. ObFandom: The most enjoyable cons are the ones where nothing went horribly wrong. The most enjoyable cons *to talk about* are the ones where everything went horribly wrong. -- Keith F. Lynch, 2017-01-22

[Newsgroup: rec.arts.sf.fandom
Subject: Re: DJT vs reality?
Message-ID: <o630j0$kpd$1@reader1.panix.com>]

theferrett: (Meazel)
[personal profile] theferrett

Humans want absolute certainty, and they will fold, spindle, and mutilate other human beings to get that illusion of perfect consistency.

The easiest example of that is politeness.

Politeness is, on the surface, an awesome idea. People get stressed because they have a terror of offending people – what if you say the wrong thing and make them mad at you? Suddenly, every meeting with a new person is this wild gamble – what conversational topics will offend them? What level of bodily contact will they find acceptable, whether that’s a hug or a handshake or a stiff nod? When is it okay to introduce yourself?

Every time you meet someone new, it’s a roll of the dice. You might insult someone. You might actually make the wrong decision and have someone loathe you – which is scary! (And if you have social anxiety, you probably feel those odds keener than other people do.)

Enter politeness – a social construct where we all agree on weird things like, “When you meet people, you should shake hands and say ‘hello,’ and then talk about neutral topics like the weather.”

Basically, politeness is a way of reducing the uncertainty in social interactions. If everyone around you knows the standards of politeness, then “Doing what’s expected” will lead to positive reactions more often than not.

And if you run into someone who’s germaphobic and thus doesn’t shake hands, they should – in theory – understand that you meant no harm by offering the handshake, it’s just customary. At which point, in an ideal and sane world, you can override the generic standards of politeness with that person’s personal stated preferences.

Which is a sane, wonderful thing to do! Basically, every around you quietly agrees on a set number of actions you undertake until you know someone better, at which point you quietly switch from the I-don’t-know-you-that-well mode default behavior and into the oh-yes-we’ve-met behaviors.

(It gets a little awkward if someone doesn’t know the local rules of politeness, but there’s no universal fix for these sorts of issues.)

Politeness changes the odds. Maybe once there was like a 40% chance of total awkwardness if you talked to a stranger, but shared conventions reduced that chance to 5%.

Which is awesome. I am totally in favor of reducing awkwardness wherever possible.

Yet here’s the folding, spindling, and mutilating bit: people will get so attached to the reduction of uncertainty that politeness brings them that they’ll start to prioritize the rules over people.

The easiest example of that is “Merry Christmas.”

Time was that saying “Merry Christmas” was a social construct that provided an illusion of consistency. When the snow was falling and the Christmas trees were up, you could say “Merry Christmas!” to anyone while you were out shopping and people were socially obligated to smile back at you.

Now, keep in mind that not everyone wanted to smile back at you. People who were Jewish may have felt understandably pissy that saying “Merry Christmas!” meant that non-believers were required to translate your holiday greeting into a generic sentiment of “Good wishes!” – but if you said “Happy Hanukkah!” to someone instead, suddenly some significant percentage of Christians would get furious because they were not obligated to translate Jewish sentiments into generic good wishes. (And God forbid a black man said something to an unsuspecting white person about Kwanzaa.)

Likewise, there’s people who don’t think of Christmas as a positive event, and so to them wishing people Merry Christmas is akin to affirming other people’s
sick habits of spending themselves into bankruptcy for no good reason. Yet the social constructs of politeness required them to say it back, or they were the dick.

And yet, over the years, that definition of politeness has quietly changed. A significant number of people have come to realize that whoah, actually, this whole “Merry Christmas” thing can be a little unfair and obscuring of non-Christmas-having faiths. So “Happy Holidays!” became the default.

And people

lost

their

shit.

And the interesting thing is that most of these folks probably aren’t really upset about “Merry Christmas” as such. What they’re actually upset about is that at one point the odds of offending someone with a jaunty “Merry Christmas!” were so low that they never even had to think about it, and suddenly those odds have changed.

Now there’s some 10% chance that saying “Merry Christmas!” might be met with an implication that they’re the dick. They’re fretting all the time because their formerly sure-fire greeting has a chance of misfire… and they fucking hate that.

And rather than saying, “Oh, wow, every social interaction (no matter how minor) has some percentage of going awry, and circumstances have changed so that people are free to express a distress they’ve always actually held and yet were constrained by social constructs until now, so maybe I should alter my behavior to lower my risk of offense in the future”….

These people weaponize politeness by saying, “ANYONE WHO DOESN’T FOLLOW THE RULES I GREW UP LEARNING IS AN OVERLY-SENSITIVE ASSHOLE.”

In other words, they’re willing to fold, spindle, and mutilate other human beings’ emotions so long as they get to hold on to this precious idea that “following this rule means nobody can be mean to me ever.”

But the truth is this: there’s no interaction you can have that doesn’t risk offending someone somewhere. Every time you speak is a gamble – you can minimize that risk with politeness, and clarity of speaking, and knowing who you’re speaking to, but every time you open your mouth you might hurt someone’s feelings.

And the proper answer to that is not “Well, fuck all those people” or “Please shut the hell up for my convenience” but to accept that communication is not a certainty, and to accept that risk of accidental injury, and to look at every situation individually to decide whether that person is justified in being hurt or whether you think they’re being unreasonable. (Because sometimes, yes, they’re being unreasonable.)

And you see that certainty everywhere – here’s the young guys getting furious because they followed the rules their older friends taught them to pick up women at a bar, and the women who that patter doesn’t work on are “bitches.” Here’s the people who are furious because the terms for trans people and black people keep transforming (in part because people keep turning the mere names for these states of being into an insult, but that’s another essay for another time), and they’re furious because dammit they should be able to learn one term always and never have to change it ever again. Here’s the Baby Boomers who are furious because they got taught to say “You’re welcome” and the Millennials say “No problem” instead and that makes them feel awkward even if the Millennials don’t mean it as awkward so you Millennials stop saying that right now it’s rude.

But here’s the trick: Prioritize people over rules whenever possible. You can’t do it all the time, because “people” are not a uniform mass and someone risks getting offended whatever you do. (I keep seeing various minorities standing up and speaking for all their fellow minorities as if they were a hive mind, only to be snarled up by debates from very visible and very dissenting other members of that minority culture.)

But you know, realize that any idea you have of “If I do this, I’ll never offend anyone” is a lie that you’re telling yourself in order to make you feel comfortable. Recognize that this lie suppresses people in order to perpetuate an illusion that does not, in fact, exist.

Recognize that you’re always risking discomfort when you talk to people. And that’s okay. You shouldn’t need certainty to thrive, because it doesn’t really exist anyway.

Be comfortable with percentages instead of certainty.

Well, be as comfortable as you can.

Cross-posted from Ferrett's Real Blog.

QotD

Thursday, March 16th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"We didn't exist in the other papers. We were neither born, we didn't get married, we didn't die, we didn't fight in any wars, we never participated in anything of a scientific achievement. We were truly invisible unless we committed a crime. And in the black press, the negro press, we did get married. They showed us our babies when born. They showed us graduating. They showed our PhDs." -- Vernon Jarrett (b. 1917-06-19, d. 2004-05-23), in The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords (1999)

[Today is Black Press Day, commemorating the publication of Freedom's Journal on this date in 1827.]

sprezzatura

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017 07:44 am
prettygoodword: (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
sprezzatura (spret-sah-TOOR-uh) - n., doing (or giving the appearance of doing) something effortlessly.


Especially as a characteristic quality of art, literature, or performance. This was adopted from Italian, where it means nonchalance, and which was coined in 1528 by Baldassare Castiglione in The Book of the Courtier, where he defined it as "a certain nonchalance, so as to conceal all art and make whatever one does or says appear to be without effort and almost without any thought about it" -- or to put it another way, "an easy facility in accomplishing difficult actions which hides the conscious effort that went into them." This was something courtiers should manage no matter what they were called upon to do -- not just to make them look effortless, but look not calculated.

---L.

QotD

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"If people cared AT ALL about security in bathrooms, if that were even a blip on anybody's radar, we wouldn't even be talking about the minority population of transgender people. We'd be discussing things like... oh, I don't know... doors that lock properly. We'd have people advocating for stall dividers that extend all the way to the damn floor. Y'know those emergency call buttons they have in some handicapped stalls? We'd be advocating for those to be standard everywhere. Or hey, how about legislation to ban people from bringing goddamn weapons into the bathroom, or to ban them from bringing in cellphones that can take pictures, or to ban them from going to the john in groups larger than three? How about extra jail time for any assault that took place in a bathroom, or a requirement for security cameras at the entrances and exits?

[...]

"Just... can we all stop pretending that the trans-bathroom debate is about anything other than making a big public statement about how you believe gender works? If you cared at all about security in bathrooms, you'd be advocating security in bathrooms."

-- Tailsteak, 2017-03-13, Leftover Soup (author's note underneath comic)

Ride sought, Thursday afternoon

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017 03:17 pm
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

Cany any of my friends give me a ride from Baltimore to Bowie and back on Thursday? (3pm doctor appointment.) I kinda lost track of the calendar again; meant to ask this last week.

theferrett: (Meazel)
[personal profile] theferrett

“You guys have so many friends,” my father once told me. “You don’t ever have to spend a night at home alone, if you don’t want. You’re lucky that way.”

We weren’t lucky, though. Some days, we were frickin’ exhausted.

The thing nobody tells you about “having a vibrant social network” is that building one and maintaining it takes a lot of effort. For every night we can call up people and magically conjure a social gathering, there’s two where we’re slumped on the couch going, “I guess we have to go out.” We’re reaching out, we’re coordinating dates on Google Calendar, we’re squeezing in time between my writing and Gini’s quilting and the kids visiting…

And that assumes we have a friends’ group to begin with! Hoo boy, if we don’t have a variety of close friends then that process gets agonizing. Suddenly, you’re going out on buddy-dates, hanging out for an evening full of awkward to see if you click as a group, and then doing it again with the same people even if it was a little awkward because honestly, most initial friend get-togethers are clunky and sometimes you need three or four gatherings before the edges rub off and you feel comfortable with each other.

I’m tired just thinking about it.

And yet when I see movies about friendships, I always see these effortless groups where friendship is a purely positive force. When the lead character has her big let down, their friends are there to catch her – yet there’s never the scene from the perspective of the friend who was planning to curl up and watch Netflix in glorious solitude and yet they had to throw all that away to be a shoulder for their buddy to sob on. (Or if they have that scene, it’s proof that friend is a bad friend for inconveniencing you, which is equally toxic.)

Friendship bolsters you. But it also costs.

And I think about that today thanks to an excellent article in the Boston Globe from a guy who doesn’t think he’s lonely. He’s got kids, plenty of people at work, a lot of friends on social media….

But after his boss assigned him the story on loneliness, he realized that he was lonely. Because he had a lot of activity in his life, but no close friends outside of his wife and his kids, and as every parent knows, your kids can be a delight but they can’t quite be your friends (at least when they’re young).

There’s a difference between staying superficially in touch with lots of people and having a few stalwart buddies.

And I think of this paragraph:

“‘Since my wife and I have written about loneliness and social isolation, we see a fair number of people for whom this is a big problem,’ Schwartz continues. But there’s a catch. ‘Often they don’t come saying they’re lonely. Most people have the experience you had in your editor’s office: Admitting you’re lonely feels very much like admitting you’re a loser. Psychiatry has worked hard to de-stigmatize things like depression, and to a large part it has been successful. People are comfortable saying they’re depressed. But they’re not comfortable saying they’re lonely, because you’re the kid sitting alone in the cafeteria.’”

I think he’s right.

I think a lot of people who are depressed are, at least in part, lonely – and they’re not sure what to do about that. (And a therapist is often just paying someone an hourly rate to listen to you, which can often be a rent-a-friend business.)

And I think part of that process of combating loneliness involves acknowledging that close friendships aren’t necessarily easy. It’s like exercise; some people are naturally drawn to working out all the time, but most of us like “having exercised” but still groan as we schlep down to the gym.

The most successful healthy people are often not the people who love exercise, but who have accepted that the minor unpleasantness of putting in an hour down at the gym will make their lives infinitely better.

Friendship, at least for me and my wife, is a weird balance, because as introverts we have a natural reluctance to going out with people. Left to our own devices, we’d rather nest in at home every evening – we’ve spent time working, we want to relax, going out with people and putting out more energy seems exhausting.

Yet we do it. Because we realize that if we followed our natural instincts all the time, we’d be unhappy in the long run. We need friends. But we can’t just call up our friends when we need them – that’s treating them like tools. So we gotta get our duffs off the couch and say those precious, precious words:

“Wanna hang out?”

We need to reach out and cultivate those relationships in advance, to schedule nights out, to go to events we’re not really thrilled about when we start out – because, like exercise, a lot of the time it actually turns out to be pretty awesome once we’ve started. You feel pumped, you feel jazzed, you feel glad that you went and did it.

A lot of maintaining good friendships is getting past that inertia of “Don’t wanna.” (The other half is knowing which nights you’re absolutely right to spend at home alone.)

Friendships are wonderful, and empowering, but they’re not a free natural resource for most of us. And I think a lot of people wind up lonelier than they should because they’ve got this weird, sitcom-fed idea that friendships just happen – Joey and Monica and Chandler just wind up on the couch at the coffee shop by magic every night.

Whereas the truth about friendships is that those “you wind up in the same place every night” usually only happen when you’re living in the same place, which only really happens in college. Once you’re a grownup, your friends scatter, and you have to chase them down – Joey’s at the cafe every Tuesday for open mic night, and Monica lives on the other side of town but really wants to see that show at the Capitol Theater, and Chandler’s working lots of overtime but hey do you wanna catch a drink when he gets off work at 8?

You have to schedule. You have to go to places with people you’re not 100% comfortable with yet. You have to decide to leave your apartment.

That all takes a certain amount of labor. And you get rewarded big in the end – there’s nothing better about walking into a room and seeing that smile when your buddy shows up and getting that hug and knowing that yeah, this evening was totally worth going out for because you stuck with these people until you had a history together.

Yet that takes effort. That effort isn’t not good, it’s not bad, it’s not wrong. It’s just… what it is. And if you don’t put in that time, you wind up lonely.

Sometimes that loneliness decays into depression. Or sometimes the depression saps your efforts to get out, which decays into more depression. (Gini and I have both been battling sickness lately, and that shows in the sad way we’ve let some of our regular social engagements slip. We want to fight that. We need to, honestly.)

But to fight that loneliness, you gotta organize outings. The get-togethers no longer come for free when you get past a certain age. And I think the sooner you can acknowledge that, and get past the reluctance to fight that, the better your life will end up being.

It’s okay that it’s not effortless.

It’s not for most people.

Now get out there and friend it up.

Cross-posted from Ferrett's Real Blog.

sanicle

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017 07:51 am
prettygoodword: (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
sanicle (SAN-i-kuhl) - n., any of various plants of the genus Sanicula of the parsley family with palmate compound leaves, umbels of small pale flowers, and fruit with hooked bristles.


About 40 species worldwide, and also called snakeroot or black snakeroot. Formerly used medicinally as an astringent -- thus its name, ultimately (via Medieval French) from Latin sānus, healthy, which also gave us sanitary.

---L.

QotD

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"A basic weapon of regime changers, as fascists realized nearly a century ago, is to destroy the concept of truth. Democracy requires the rule of law, the rule of law depends upon trust, and trust depends upon citizens' acceptance of factuality. The president and his aides actively seek to destroy Americans' sense of reality. Not only does the White House spread "alternative facts," but Kellyanne Conway openly proclaims this as right and good. Post-factuality is pre-fascism." -- Timothy Snyder, 2017-03-03 (thanks to [info] - personal twistedchick linking to this.)

Marking A Milestone In Woodworking

Monday, March 13th, 2017 01:21 pm
theferrett: (Meazel)
[personal profile] theferrett

So on Saturday, I started the finish to the shadowbox I’ve been working on for my sweetie.

On Saturday, everything that could go wrong with the wood did.

A “shadowbox” is a recessed case – basically, a frame you can put a three-dimensional object into.  The object in this case is “a sock.”  Because my sweetie refuses to tell me where she wants to go when we go out on  dates, and I have to remind her in true Harry Potter style that Dobby has been given his sock, and so I’m officially going to give her her sock so she’ll remember that I’m never going to get mad at her for expressing an opinion.

So I’d prepped the wood on a previous weekend, and Saturday was cutting grooves into it and cutting it into pieces that would fit together into a box.  And it was a frustrating day, because I’d lost several tools and had to go hunting around for them, and then I didn’t know how either one of my routers worked to switch bits efficiently, and I couldn’t figure out how to get the table saw set up for bevelled cuts, and when I finally did I cut the pieces the wrong way so the box shrunk from seven inches to six inches to five inches as I kept adjusting, and when I finally assembled it the grooves were half on the outside of the box, half on the inside.

I’d spent two sessions, only to end up with a useless partial case.

A little disheartening.

But on Sunday, my wife was feeling sleepy so at 8:00 I decided to get out and put in another couple of hours in the shop.

I killed it.

Now that I knew where all my tools were and how to use them, I cut myself a perfect shadowbox in 52 minutes.  All my measurements were right, my safety game was on, and I was in the zone.

And that may be the first time I’ve felt competent as a woodworker ever.

Woodworking is weird.  I do it because I like it, but there’s also that odd pressure because woodworking is a traditionally masculine skill, and I’ve never been good with my hands.  (Unless they’re typing words at a keyboard.)  Whenever I fuck up a cut, I think of all those videos where the bearded confident guy quietly assembles a mahogany end table in a half-an-hour show and never says “oops” and never has to stand there calling Norm over to go, “Okay, now, how do we fix this damn thing?”

And I know, I know, that’s not reality.  I’m told by professional woodworkers that half the time at their shop is futzing around for that tool they laid here somewhere.  But there’s this image, somehow, of the woodworker I should be which is partially of the man I should be and I never quite get there.

Last night, dear reader, I got there.

And I know I’ll screw it up again.  The guys are coming over to assemble Eric’s shelf on Wednesday, and we’re gonna screw things up like nobody’s business.  There’s no shame in screwing up.

The real reason I’m proud of Sunday night’s shadowbox is because everything I did so quickly was purely because I’d screwed up.  How did I change that routing bit so easily?  Well, I remembered where the wrenches were and knew how to get at the collar.  How did I know how to bevel the boards properly?  Because I’d spent half an hour learning how to use the table saw and learned a valuable lesson on how to cut angles.

Basically, last night’s speed run was where I turned mistakes into lessons.

That sort of conversion is what it’s all about.  There’s no shame in screwing up.  In our shop, we call them Valuable Lessons – as in, “Well, I think we’ve all learned a Valuable Lesson tonight” – and that’s how we get better.

Last night, I got better.

I’m marking that moment here so I don’t forget.

The shadowbox.

 

Cross-posted from Ferrett's Real Blog.

sharawadgi

Monday, March 13th, 2017 07:46 am
prettygoodword: (Default)
[personal profile] prettygoodword
It just so happens I've got a series of S- words lined up, so let's make it a sinuous theme week:


sharawadgi or sharawaggi (shay-ruh-WAY-dji) - n. a style of landscape architecture in which rigid lines and symmetry are avoided to give the scene an organic, naturalistic appearance.


Hang on to your hat or other appropriate clothing item, this gets complicated. So, in English, this is known as a Chinese style, and there is indeed such a style in Chinese aesthetics. However, comma, this is in no way, not even with the most generous allowance for corrupted transmission, any of the possible Chinese terms for this. It first appeared in English in a 1692 essay by Sir William Temple called "Upon the Gardens of Epicurus," who also gave it the Chinese source. Exactly where he got it is unknown, but it seems likely he got it from the Netherlands, via Dutch East Indies traders who apparently picked up the Japanese term sorowaji (揃わじ), meaning irregular/asymmetry (it's both a noun and an adjective) -- and to Brits of the time, "the Chineses" meant everything east Asian. (Note that while Japanese does have shara'aji (洒落味), "refined taste", there's no evidence it existed that long ago.)

---L.

QotD

Monday, March 13th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"The truth of the matter is that privileged people have all of society as a safe space; our culture and even our laws are formed around their comfort. The most unequal laws of history have existed to protect the safe space of those in power -- a space safe from abortions, from queer marriages, from black people and women voting, from anything that challenges their supremacy. Many of the people catered to by the entire setup of society are the same ones who would claim that life never gave them a 'safe space.'

"Of course the privileged don't understand the need for such a space. Safe spaces exist to give marginalized people a quiet moment of respite from a society that has done everything in its power to disenfranchise and disempower us. Those who have power, money, and influence have never experienced such a thing. The world has been made safe for them from the beginning."

-- Na'amen Gobert Tilahun, "Easily-Triggered Privileged People Have Turned Society Into Their Own Giant Safe Space", 2017-01-30

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